RESOURCE: Application for Big Cover Up youth project open to area schools

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

CONTACT: Andrea Roy, director of community impact, at 304-523-8929, ext. 107

 

Application for Big Cover Up youth project open to area schools

 

HUNTINGTON, W.VA.—United Way of the River Cities is accepting grant proposals from area high schools for The Big Cover Up youth initiative.

 

The Big Cover Up is a matching grant available to student service clubs that develop a project to provide coats, hats, gloves and other necessary warm clothing to younger students in need. High schools in Cabell, Wayne, Lincoln, and Mason counties in West Virginia, and in Lawrence County, Ohio, are eligible to apply.

 

“Now in its 19th year, The Big Cover Up has helped provide warm clothing to hundreds of local children and taught hundreds more high school students the joy of giving back to their community,” said Andrea Roy, director of community impact.

 

Matching funds raised by student groups are not required to be dollar-for-dollar for grant funds; monies raised, in-kind contributions, or discounts from retailers all can be counted as match. Each group must have a faculty sponsor. However, the project must be youth-led.

 

Grant awards are generously funded through a donation from Advantage Toyota. The application and complete project guidelines are available by contacting Roy at 304-523.-8929, ext. 107 or by e-mail to andrea.roy@unitedwayrivercities.org. The application deadline is November 16, 2018.

 

United Way of the River Cities is a nonprofit organization, the mission of which is to fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in their community. To learn more about the United Way of the River Cities or to donate please visit unitedwayrivercities.org.

 

###

 

CLICK to download PR

Application for Big Cover Up youth project open to area schools 10-17-18

RESOURCE: Scholarship List & Financial Aid Updates

Scholarship List & Financial Aid Updates

Scholarship list and financial aid updates for WV students

SOURCE:  For more scholarship opportunities, visit CFWV.com. The site houses scholarship search tools to help you find scholarship programs across the nation!

“What do I need to file my FAFSA?”

Check out this list of 7 things you’ll need to file the 2019-2020 FAFSA.

Scholarships and Financial Aid Programs

CFWV has a database of thousands of scholarships and financial aid programs from organizations across the nation! We post several opportunities each week on Facebook and Twitter. Below are a few programs we’ve shared lately.
Check this one out! Federal Pell Grant
For: 12th graders; college students; adult learners
Link: http://www.fafsa.gov
New! Small Business Scholarship
Deadline: October 19, 2018
For: current college students
Link: https://bit.ly/2F1uUAz
New! Scooter Scholarship
Deadline: October 30, 2018
For: high school seniors, college students, graduate students
Link: https://bit.ly/2QrO9dt
New! Coca-Cola Scholars Program Scholarship
Deadline: October 31, 2018
For: high school seniors
Link: https://bit.ly/2mvzKPV
New! American Bullion Scholarship
Deadline: October 31, 2018
For: current college students
Link: https://bit.ly/2qo43ZJ
New! Turner Pest Control Community Service Scholarship
Deadline: November 1, 2018
For: current college students
Link: https://bit.ly/2Qs48Yl
New! Ivey Engineering Scholarship
Deadline: November 1, 2018; May 1, 2019
For: high school seniors, current college students
Link: https://bit.ly/2CUAd3G
New! Video Contest for College Students
Deadline: December 17, 2018
For: undergraduate students, graduate students
Link: https://bit.ly/2DRvbuB
New! Tese Caldarelli Memorial Scholarship
Deadline: December 31, 2018
For: undergraduate students, graduate students
Link: https://bit.ly/2iXYAG4
New! Zagunis Student Leader Scholarship
Deadline: December 31, 2018
For: undergraduate students, graduate students
Link: https://bit.ly/2D5vBYu
New! Create-a-Greeting-Card Scholarship
Deadline: March 1, 2019
For: high school students, college students
Link: https://bit.ly/2pszvWe
New! Eastern West Virginia Community Foundation Scholarships
(Multiple scholarships available!)

Deadline: Varies
For: West Virginia students in Berkeley, Morgan, and Jefferson counties
Link: https://bit.ly/2OurEXn
Courage to Grow Scholarship
Deadline: monthly
For: high school juniors/seniors; current college students
Link: http://bit.ly/1GkOxRd
For more scholarship opportunities, visit CFWV.com. The site houses scholarship search tools to help you find scholarship programs across the nation!

Financial Aid Timeline for WV Students

October 1
The 2019-2020 FAFSA opens. Any student planning to attend college in the 2019-2020 academic year should file a FAFSA at fafsa.gov.
October 1
The PROMISE Scholarship application opens for the class of 2019.
March 1, 2019
Deadline to submit the FAFSA and complete the application to apply for the PROMISE Scholarship.
April 15, 2019
Deadline to submit the FAFSA to apply for the West Virginia Higher Education Grant Program.
April 15, 2019
The Nursing Scholarship application becomes available.
June 1, 2019
Deadline to apply for the Nursing Scholarship.

Upcoming Financial Aid Workshops

East Hardy High School
October 3 at 6 p.m.
Tyler Consolidated High School
October 3 at 6 p.m.
Buckhannon Upshur High School
October 4 at 8 a.m.
Greenbrier West High School
October 4 at 8 a.m.
Nicholas County High School
October 4 at 8 a.m.
Valley High School (Fayette)
October 4 at 4 p.m.
Gaston Caperton Center
October 4 at 5 p.m.
James Monroe High School
October 5 at 11 a.m.
Tygarts Valley High School
October 8 at 6 p.m.
Lincoln County High School
October 9 at 8 a.m.
Fairmont Senior High School
October 9 at 5:30 p.m.
East Fairmont High School
October 9 at 6 p.m.
Sissonville High School
October 9 at 6 p.m.
Spring Mills High School
October 9 at 6 p.m.
Wirt County High School
October 10 at 9 a.m.
Lewis County High School
October 10 at 4 p.m.
Huntington High School
October 11 at 8 a.m.
Doddridge High School
October 11 at 12 p.m.
Moorefield High School
October 11 at 2 p.m.
Moorefield High School
October 11 at 6 p.m.
Herbert Hoover High School
October 15 at 8 a.m.
Parkersburg South High School
October 15 at 4 p.m.
Magnolia High School
October 15 at 6 p.m.
Brooke High School
October 16 at 7 a.m.
Webster County High School
October 16 at 9 a.m.
Cross Lanes Christian School
October 16 at 10 a.m.
View more…
Note: We provide links to outside scholarship programs to help our students connect with resources to pay for postsecondary education. However, inclusion in this newsletter does not represent an endorsement of any outside organization, program, or cause.

EVENT: Girl Power for middle school girls Oct. 8th

 

CLICK BELOW to download the invitation and registration form:

Girl power flier invitation & registration PDF

 

This 2nd annual fun and informative event is for middle school girls and their parents and/or group leaders. Reservations are required.

**********************************

For organizations that would like to set up an information table, please contact the FRN office for details.

Cabell County Family Resource Network, Inc.

1002 3rd Avenue,  Floor 3, Huntington, WV 25701

304-697-0255

RESOURCE: Free Code Your World Kits: Please forward to schools, teachers, libraries, and after school programs

Are you a teacher, public librarian, or afterschool program serving youth in grades 4-8 in WV? Register to receive a free NYSD Code Your World kit!

 

Help kids in your school, community, or afterschool program join more than 150,000 children across the country participate in the 11th annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (4-H NYSD) challenge this fall. This year’s challenge, Code Your World, teaches young people computer science skills through four engaging hands-on activities.

No prior computer science experience is needed for the teacher/facilitator or participating youth!

 

Developed by Google and West Virginia University Extension Service, this hands-on experience includes a computer-based activity on Google’s CS First platform, as well as three unplugged activities that bring coding to life through games and interaction. Code Your World is perfect for first-time and beginner coders, ages 8 to 14. Each kit comes equipped with all the materials necessary for youth to complete the experience, including instruction booklets for both youth and adult facilitators.

WV School Teachers, Public Libraries, and Afterschool Programs can register for a free kit here: https://wvu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_egmv0jwb739khM1

Supply is limited and registration will close when all kits are allocated. Kits will be distributed in late September.

4-H NYSD is an annual program that provides access and opportunity for kids everywhere to take an interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) by participating in a hands-on STEM challenge. All kids everywhere are invited to participate in 4-H NYSD. Additional information can be found at https://4-h.org/parents/national-youth-science-day/. Code Your World kits are also available for sale here.

4-H NYSD 2018 was developed in collaboration with Google, with support from our national partners—BNY Mellon; Corteva AgriscienceTM , Agriculture Division of DowDuPontTM; and HughesNet. Funding to supply free kits to West Virginia schools, libraries, and afterschool programs was provided by the West Virginian University Provost’s Office.

For more information, please contact:

Jen Robertson-Honecker, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Specialist

West Virginia University Extension Service

4-H Youth Development

Jen.Robertson@mail.wvu.edu

EVENT: Stuff the Bus school supply drive dates

Each year United Ways across the country partner with their local Walmarts to hold a community school supply drive called Stuff the Bus. Volunteers provide shoppers with a list of needed supplies compiled by the school system and encourage them to purchase an item to donate. Donated items are placed on a bus in the parking lot and driven to a distribution point at the end of the event.

This year, UWRC is holding Stuff the Bus events on two separate Saturdays:

Saturday, August 4 from 10 am – 1 pm – Lawrence County, OH, and Mason County, WV

And

Saturday, August 11 from 10 am – 1 pm – Cabell (both Walmarts), Wayne, and Lincoln counties (the Lincoln County Event will be a Back-to-School Bash, since they don’t have a Walmart)

 

We need volunteers at all locations to talk up the cause, pass out lists to entering customers, track donations on the bus, and/or help unload at the distribution points. This is a very tangible way to help vulnerable students in our service area, plus it’s fun and family-friendly!

 

Locations are listed below. If you’re interested in helping, please sign up at http://www.unitedwevolunteer.org/aem/general/. Feel free to contact Andrea Roy at andrea.roy@unitedwayrivercities.org or 304.523.8929, ext. 107 with any questions.

 

Mason County
Mason Walmart Supercenter, 320 Mallard Lane, Mason, WV 25260

 

Lawrence County, OH
South Point Walmart Supercenter, 354 Private Drive 288, South Point, OH 45680

 

Cabell County

Barboursville Walmart Supercenter, 25 Nichols Drive, Barboursville, WV 25504

Huntington Walmart Supercenter, 3333 US Route 60, Huntington, WV 25705

 

Wayne County

Wayne Walmart Supercenter, 100 McGinnis Drive, Wayne, WV 25570

Lincoln County – Back-to-School Bash!  Details to follow

TBD

 

Feel free to share this opportunity!

Contact:  Andrea Roy at andrea.roy@unitedwayrivercities.org or 304.523.8929, ext. 107 with any questions.

SUMMER FUN: My Top 4 Children’s Books To Help Prevent Summer Learning Loss Blog by Kaylin Staten

By Kaylin R. Staten ⌛

Summer Learning Day was July 12, and the Cabell County Family Resource Network and its initiative, the Cabell County Student Empowerment Team, have been promoting ways to encourage summer learning and decrease learning loss. The National Summer Learning Association has a wealth of knowledge for parents, educators and more.

SLD-Logo_2018-3C-RGB_Date-3C-RGB-300x300.jpg

According to CCSET’s op-ed piece in The Herald-Dispatch:

“In many cases, most students lose at least two months of their mathematical skills every summer. Summer is especially critical for the most vulnerable students in our community. This group includes children who receive special education services and those who live in poverty. According to a study by John Hopkins University, ‘Summer learning loss during elementary school accounts for two-thirds of the achievement GAP IN READING between low-income children and their middle-income peers by ninth grade.’”

Summer learning was always a facet of my life as a child and young adult. Whether my sister and I hosted “private” fan clubs underneath the dining room table (and counted “members”) or I rang up customer’s purchases at our family’s store when I was a toddler, I’ve always been an engaged person when it comes to learning. Since I was a child, I’ve had books by my side, so it has always been relatively easy for me to read in every season. I mean, I used to forgo nap time to read books. I love to read, and that has shaped my career as a professional writer.

The National Summer Learning Association has a four-page PDF of recommended reading lists for newborns to children in 8th grade. In addition to this expansive and great list, I have some recommendations from my own childhood to share with you. Here are four of my favorite children’s books:

Ages 0-5

How The Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss

9780394800790.jpg

I have always been obsessed with The Grinch. In fact, my husband and I purchased How The Grinch Stole Christmas for our niece, Aubree, as a baby shower present. It was the first book I ever read to her — and she was born in August. I read and reread this classic year-round. It’s a story of being grumpy (hello, me in the mornings) and making some mistakes but also finding redemption, love and friendship. (And I also love other Dr. Seuss books!)

Grades K-2

Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney

81FCd31TgYL.jpg

I received this book from my second-grade teacher. She gave each student a book during the school year. I can’t remember if it was for Christmas or something, but this book has always stayed with me. I loved the story of Miss Rumphius, from her beginnings as a young girl to when she became an old woman. It taught me early on about having a legacy, being passionate about traveling and that little girls can accomplish anything. Plus, the artwork is beautiful!

Grades 3-5

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

9780147514004.jpg

I first encountered Anne of Green Gables in fifth grade when we watched the movie in class. I read the book and fell in love with Prince Edward Island and all of Anne’s experiences on the Canadian island. Anne was optimistic and true to herself, which is something we all need to hear as children (and adults!). This was one of the first long-term tales I invested in as a child.

Grades 6-8

The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

51KwENWbsYL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Fantasy has always been one of my favorite genres. It’s easy to escape to another land, and be fully immersed in the epic story of Narnia and its key protagonists and antagonists. Although I have an affinity for the “good” characters, I always was fascinated with The White Witch and her Turkish Delight and inner motivations. What can I say? I do love flawed characters, too. Plus, who wouldn’t want to find a snowy dreamscape in your own wardrobe or closet?

What’s your favorite book from your childhood? Trust me, this is only a brief snippet of the books I love!

To learn more summer learning tips and to find resources, visit www.summerlearning.org and cabellempower.org.


Copyright © MMXVIII Hourglass Omnimedia, LLC

Kaylin R. Staten is an award-winning public relations practitioner and writer. She owns Hourglass Omnimedia, a consulting company based in Huntington, WV.

https://www.hourglassomnimedia.com/behindthehourglassblog/my-top-4-childrens-books-to-help-prevent-summer-learning-loss

ARTICLE: Op-Ed Encourage your children to continue learning this summer

Cabell County Student Empowerment Team Executive Director Ellenda Ward penned a summer learning op-ed for July 12th  edition of The Herald-Dispatch.

 

It is the lazy, hazy days of summer. School is out; however, that doesn’t mean learning has to stop. I encourage you to find unique ways to share learning experiences with a child.

For example, children like to use their creativity to please others. As adults, we have wonderful opportunities to share our talents and expertise to introduce them to new or different learning experiences during summer vacation. Are you passionate about your hobby? If possible, find ways to scale hobby projects to age appropriate situations with children this summer.

My grandson, Declan Ward, age 6, enjoys sharing my scrapbooking hobby. We recently spent two afternoons where he designed Father’s Day cards for his dad and grandfathers. I had gathered a variety of papers, stickers, washi tape, letters, crayons and tools for him to use for his three cards. I gave him suggestions, but he made all of the choices and designed each card with each person in mind. During the two-hour sessions each day, he was reinforcing his skills mastered in kindergarten by learning how to spell his sentiments, focus on printing, fold paper, measure, use scrapbook cutting tools and coloring skills. At the end of each session, he had been introduced to many techniques I enjoy using. Most of all, the learning experiences provided an opportunity for us to share special time together.

In many cases, most students lose at least two months of their mathematical skills every summer. Summer is especially critical for the most vulnerable students in our community. This group includes children who receive special education services and those who live in poverty. According to a study by John Hopkins University, “Summer learning loss during elementary school accounts for two-thirds of the achievement GAP IN READING between low-income children and their middle-income peers by ninth grade.”

July 12 is the Day of Summer Learning, and the Cabell County Student Empowerment Team (CCSET) and the Cabell County Family Resource Network (Cabell County FRN) are promoting resources and information to keep children engaged in learning all summer long.

How can you provide summer learning opportunities for the children in your life? The National Summer Learning Association has a variety of resources to help parents, caregivers and others prevent summer learning loss:

1. Read at home every day. Help your children choose books that interest them, set reading goals and even start a family book club.

2. Write in a summer journal. Keeping a journal is thrilling to all of the little writers and readers in your household. Even if your child isn’t interested in keeping a journal, encourage him or her to write about the books they’re reading, their summer activities and other happenings in their lives.

3. Go to a local library. In addition to checking out physical and digital books, the Cabell County Public Library hosts several children’s events where your child can create and learn something new. Learn more at cabell.lib.wv.us.

4. Look for free or low-cost activities in your community. The Cabell County Family Resource Network’s Pathways to Summer Fun resource guide provides several free and low-cost summer camps, activities and events for local children. Download the full list at cabellfrn.org.

5. Plant a garden. Start a simple vegetable or fresh herb garden on a windowsill in your house or outside in the backyard. This encourages responsibility and healthy eating.

6. Use counting skills in daily activities. Ask your child to count ingredients in your dinner recipe and calculate coupon discounts at the grocery store. This helps to keep math skills sharp over the summer.

7. Volunteer together. Cabell County has several volunteering opportunities, whether it’s spending time helping others at a nonprofit or doing something with your religious organization. Learn more at cabellfrn.org.

8. Don’t forget to be active. Don’t just stay indoors this summer, and give those digital devices a break. Go on a walk with your child, take a bike ride and visit one of the Greater Huntington Parks and Recreations parks near you.

9. Get creative. Just like I stated before, encourage your child or grandchild to get creative. Get some good

ideas at www.pinterest.com/cabellcountyfrn.

As parents and caregivers, it’s our responsibility to help our children continue to learn every summer. Give your child a head start for the coming school year.

To learn more about the Day of the Summer Learning and the National Summer Learning Association, visit www.summerlearning.org. To learn more about CCSET and the Cabell County FRN, visit http://www.cabellfrn.org/home/ccset/ and www.cabellfrn.org.

 

Ellenda Ward is director of the Cabell County Student Empowerment Team, an initiative of the Cabell County Family Resource Network.

 

Source: Read it here! http://www.herald-dispatch.com/…/article_57f4de36-a860-5c17…